Monday, December 22, 2008

Spread of Activation II: The Resolution Edition


The holidays are upon us again and a New Year just around the corner. Time for a change.

Lately, I've become restless here at Cinema Styles. I don't feel I'm doing enough of what I want to with this blog on a weekly basis. I want to do more reviews, introduce new features (that inevitably fall by the wayside), spark more discussion. Since November, I've let Cinema Styles slide a bit, not devoting as much time to it as I should. The last couple of months have produced far more picture posts than previous months and I want more than that. Don't get me wrong, I love my picture posts and have no intention of stopping them, it's just that there's more I want to do. And that 'more' is this: Opinion. What do I mean? I mean this: As the hits have increased I feel I have pulled back on writing from the gut and going with my instincts.

But more to the point, I've shied away from more controversial topics or just expressing an opinion that might land me in a bit of hot water with fellow cinephiles and I'm bored with it. I'm not saying I want to become that "jerk blogger" who's always burning bridges but I want to get back to why I started this blog in the first place: To write about movies, to express my love for them and to be honest in my reactions. A part of this feeling comes from reading bloggers like Flickhead, Marilyn, Kimberly and Arbogast. Not that there aren't other bloggers like them (so if I didn't mention you it's not an intentional slight) it's just that those bloggers come to mind as examples of writers who not only speak their minds (anyone can do that) but back their opinions up with solid writing, good examples and just the right amount of attitude. Flickhead and Arbogast consistently amaze me with their blunt, to the point reactions that don't come off as offensive or insulting like some young, scorched earth bloggers I've read. And Kimberly and Marilyn seem able to inject politics into their writing without fear of backlash. So I'm impressed and want to get back there myself (waits for collective groan about posts on racism in the movies and documentaries about nuclear arms starting up again).

So that's my New Year's Resolution, to stop second-guessing myself and my posts. It's an easy resolution to keep. Anyone who's been blogging any significant amount of time (and in the blogging world, two years is considered a significant amount of time) knows that you get to a point where you just don't care anymore about keeping up with Joneses, you stop worrying about how many posts you have and on what topic and you just start writing for yourself again and hope people will find you interesting enough to read. Just ask Dennis or Larry. It's clear they both arrived there in the last couple of years and seem more relaxed than ever with their blogging. The Siren got their long ago too it seems. And now, hopefully, so will I.

And now some parting morsels:

*In January I will, believe it or not, have a short post looking back at the scant few movies I've seen from 2008. I've seen a lot more in the last few weeks and am rotating through nothing but 2008 movies in my Netflix queue right now.

*Also, in January, Marilyn kicks off the first ever post for The Oldest Established Really Important Film Club at Ferdy on Films. The film will be The True Meaning of Pictures: Shelby Lee Adams' Appalachia and all are invited to join in. Once the post goes up there will be a permanent link here. For now, it simply links to Marilyn's blog. In February I will take a hold of the reins with The Tin Drum. As for March, no word from Rick yet on what that might be but check in at the Film Club for updates.

*I've got movie books. Lots of movie books. And you're going to hear about them. I enjoyed writing up The Haunted Cinema in October and want to write about others as well.

*Name that Movie will continue and we may soon have a winner. Arbogast stands at eight (first to ten wins) but has not guessed the last three. Is Arbo slipping?

*Currently working on two movies. One is a montage that I'm very pleased with and is a little different than what you're used to here. It should be ready by February. The other is a short film in which I'm going for a specific reaction based on horror motifs and built-in genre expectations by producing a film ( about two-thirds done at this point) with no characters that are seen on the screen or dialogue heard and yet the viewer not only understands what is happening, and understands what characters are involved, but is viscerally affected by it. It won't be shown here of course, it will be on my personal blog. So why am I telling you? Because once I'm done I might e-mail a few of you to ask your opinion of it, that's why. Be completely honest of course, while somehow finding a way to kiss my ass at the same time.

*Tomorrow or Wednesday, I'll be putting up my Holiday montage, a video card for all my readers and wonderful friends I have made here on this blog. And then...

*I'm taking a few days off. I'll have a post here or there before the New Year but don't count on anything big until we're into 2009. I'll leave the video up for a few days, visit and comment on other blogs and generally just relax (so everyone write lots of important stuff that I can read while I'm taking a break from Cinema Styles). But that's not until Wednesday. For now, I'm still around, and speaking of resolutions, still smoking. Come Monday, January 5th, that ends too. Yikes. Wish me luck.

65 comments:

Flickhead said...

"Flickhead and Arbogast consistently amaze me with their blunt, to the point reactions that don't come off as offensive or insulting like some young, scorched earth bloggers I've read."

Thanks, Jonathan, I appreciate your mention -- it means a lot to me. Compliments like yours are few and far between in Blogland.

Not to sound snide, but back in the past (mostly my published writing in the 70s and 80s), when I was offensive and insulting, it never really accomplished anything except piss people off. There's really not much of a future in that, as "the young, scorched earth bloggers" of today will eventually discover.

Marilyn said...

Thanks, Jonathan. You make me wonder whether I should be more afraid of backlash for my political writing, and I have to admit that Vera Drake seemed a bit of a risk to me - there are a lot of people who troll around for somewhere to lay their landmines. I guess I wouldn't know how to do it any other way - having a social conscience compels me to speak my mind.

I'm really looking forward to your new films and all the other goodies you have in store.

As for the club - I sent you an e-mail that I might want to change the film. This may cause some inconvenience to some, but I realize that I won't be able to pick another film for another year, and I want this one to count. If it creates a problem, you can go first, and I'll take Feburary. I want to do The True Meaning of Pictures, which is available on Netflix.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Flickhead, I think you're right of course. Scorched Earth blogging accomplishes nothing. My views on film were so very black and white when I was younger and I laugh now at some of the opinions I held. And I am forever grateful there were no blogs back then to forever record those opinions for posterity.

You and the other bloggers I mentioned, as well as everyone else who regularly comment here, have inspired and influenced me more than I can say. I've changed a lot about how I write and what I write about thanks to all of you.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Marilyn, changing films at this date shouldn't be a problem at all. I made the update just now at TOERIFC (what a Toerifc acronym). I don't think it should cause a problem, there's still plenty of time for everyone to get it and watch it. And since we will not be writing the post, our job is to simply watch before the 12th which I think we all can do. Besides, I want to finish reading The Tin Drum before putting up my post so I definitely don't want to switch dates.

As for inserting politics into your posts I think the big difference is that you balance it with deference to the opinions of others and command respect among the rest of us. We know you're speaking from the heart and not just looking to start a fire. That's something a lot of people don't know how to do.

Marilyn said...

Wonderful. And thank you for that lovely compliment. I try to be what Fox News says it is (but is not) - fair and balanced. I like to think things through for myself - unfortunately, that seems to be too much of chore for some people.

Jonathan Lapper said...

I like to think things through for myself - unfortunately, that seems to be too much of chore for some people.

Or just not thinking about it at all. Which is one thing that excites me about the Film Club - Dissecting the films, having our own opinions but perhaps changing them as we talk through it and work it out as we go.

Shifting opinions is one of the great benefits of growing. There's nothing I dislike more than expressing a view to someone I've known for years only to get, "You didn't use to think that." Well, no, I've grown. It happens. My first wife was like that unfortunately. Everything she believed in high school got locked in, immutable and unchanging. She never seemed willing to think things through, especially as circumstances changed. I found it kind of sad.

Marilyn said...

It is sad, Jonathan. It's like being trapped in a block of ice, and ultimately, it's isolating. You find that like an unfrozen dinosaur in a scifi movie, that you don't belong to the time in which you find yourself.

The one thing I have the most trouble with these days is that many younger people I meet (particularly at work) think I have nothing to offer - I'm over the hill and couldn't possibly understand what they're talking about. About music, definitely they're right. I couldn't even talk about rock music when I was a teen and in college.

About other things, definitely not. YOu know what one of them did the other day? Asked me to sew a button on his suit jacket. Why? I look like his mother or grandmother, I guess. We sew buttons on.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Marilyn, the button thing - that's jaw-dropping. As for not thinking you have anything to offer, well, if I am to believe the teenagers under my roof my wife and I don't understand anything about how the world works. They do their best to guide our addled minds to the path of wisdom and we do our best to stifle the almost unquenchable laughter. Once they grow a little more and take on more responsibilities they will understand, as the oldest already does. Those young'ens at work will get there too. Unfortunately for you and I, once they get there a new set will take their place. By that point they'll be asking us to hem their pants while they explain that Cliched Derivative Band X is so much more profound and real than that crap we listened to.

Arbogast said...

Cliched Derivative Band X

Or as I like to call it, 30 Rock.

Marilyn said...

Teenaged know-it-alls I have no trouble with. That's what they're supposed to do. The ones in their 20s are the ones whose heads I want to hold in the toilet for a few moments. The disrespect is what gets me. Mongrels.

Pat said...

Jonathan -

I look forward to your posts, both now and in 2009. A lot of what you write here reasonates with me. I've given a lot of thought lately to why I blog and what I really want to accomplish (the end of the year is always a good time to take stock, right?)

Like you, I'd like to spend more time creating quality posts on films I really care about, and also challenging myself to think harder and deeper about the films I see. A big part of why I visit blogs like yours, Marilyn's, Rick's, Bills' and others is to be challenged in just that way.

I think I also want to spend a little time reacquainting myself with basic film theory, which is why I've unearthed the textbook from my first college film studies class (in 1977!), "How to Read a Film."

I so admire the bloggers like yourself who are well informed, mature and willing to be blunt and a bit controversial. It doesn't come so easily to me - I have opinions, but also a very strong need to "get along" and be liked, and it extends to my writing, for better or worse. But in 2009, I want to stop shying away from debates.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Arbo - I've never watched 30 Rock. And now you've ruined it for me.

Jonathan Lapper said...

The ones in their 20s are the ones whose heads I want to hold in the toilet for a few moments. The disrespect is what gets me. Mongrels.

I no longer have any memories of my twenties. My teen years yes, but not my twenties. It was aimless. But I'm sure I was insufferable.

Jonathan Lapper said...

I think I also want to spend a little time reacquainting myself with basic film theory, which is why I've unearthed the textbook from my first college film studies class (in 1977!), "How to Read a Film."

By James Monaco? I've got the same text book! I also have the Analyzing Films textbook (white cover, light blue borders, pic of 2001 in the center) but I'm not home right now and I can't remember who edited it.

One of the things I like about How to Read a Film is that it delves into television as well and because of the time it was written you get a good picture of the development of social attitudes on television through the seventies. That will definitely be one of the books I profile in 2009.

Flickhead said...

There’s an interesting subtopic: what were the university textbooks we were assigned back in the day? Mine were Lee Bobker’s Elements of Film and McLuhan’s Understanding Media, among others (since forgotten). My film/communications professor, Bruce Powers, co-wrote The Global Village with McLuhan in 1988.

Marilyn said...

Did anyone study propaganda in media? That's the only course approaching a film course I took in college.

Jonathan Lapper said...

I never read those two but it's pretty impressive that your professor co-wrote a book with McLuhan.

As far as actual textbooks go, I only have the two I mentioned since my major was Theatre and I only took a couple of film classes, which wasn't offered as a major at CUA.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Did anyone study propaganda in media?

Not per se, but I did take a Philosophy of Art class that covered film, literature, painting, and other media and how those mediums were/are used to create or support ideas. The idea of the class being not to study art, as you would in a history class, but study the ideas behind them. It was one of my favorite classes ever!

Arbogast said...

There’s an interesting subtopic: what were the university textbooks we were assigned back in the day? Mine were Lee Bobker’s Elements of Film and McLuhan’s Understanding Media, among others (since forgotten).

I wasn't given Elements of Film as a required text but I did steal it from the college library. (Sports and nursing school - trust me, no one has even so much as looked for that book in the twenty-some years since.) The only textbook I remember getting was James Monaco's How to Read a Film which I have right here next to me, right next to the Bobker book.

Marilyn said...

Mine was called Propaganda and the Mass Media and it was one of my very favorite classes, too. Surprisingly, my classics courses gave me a lot of food for thought about message manipulation.

Marilyn said...

Arbo - I was looking for that book. I'm turning you in. You're going to have to crack into one of your CDs to pay the fine.

Jonathan Lapper said...

James Monaco must've had a deal with the universities or something.

The first film book I ever made mine, I stole. But accidentally. It was from my middle school and it was called Silents to sound : a History of the Movies by Juliet P. Schoen. It's where I get the subtitle of my blog name from. Anyway, I picked it up when it first arrived and read through it in the library then casually put it in my book bag without thinking and only realized what I had done when I got home. I still have it. It's like a first dollar would be for a business.

Jonathan Lapper said...

I think Arbo should crack open his Best of Wang Chung CD instead.

Krauthammer said...

Marilyn: I haven't taken a class on Propaganda, but I somehow ended up doing two different essays on it this semester. My stuff was mostly on theory (Eisenstein etc.) than practical applications though. It's a fascinating topic.


My high school's film textbook was Barsam's Looking at Movies, Though Bordwell's Film Art has been very helpful for me on my free time.

Flickhead said...

If anyone's looking for the San Francisco Public Library's hardcover edition of William Arnold's Frances Farmer bio, Shadowland (missing since 1979), it's right here.

Marilyn said...

I can't believe the only book I ever stole from a library was French Made Simple. (Made, Bill, not Maid).

Jonathan Lapper said...

KH - Few directors go hand in hand with propaganda better than Eisenstein. It's just that he also made it art at the same time. I have both his books too, and I remember you mentioning them on your blog as being dry, or something to that effect. It's true. Eisenstein works much better behind the camera where he can show us what to do, rather than explain it in very lengthy terms.

Jonathan Lapper said...

If anyone's looking for the San Francisco Public Library's hardcover edition of William Arnold's Frances Farmer bio, Shadowland (missing since 1979), it's right here.

That's where it is! I've been looking for that damn thing.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Marilyn - Is French indeed more simple for you now?

Pat said...

Yes, it was the James Monaco text, but of course, you've figured that out and moved on. If you're going to profil the Monaco book, I will look forward to that.

Now If you'll excuse me, I'm going to sign out and go put some ice on my back - which I've injured twice in the last 72 hours. Just re-injured it about 30 mins. ago while shopping at Kohl's. This is shaping up to be a pretty crappy holiday.

Marilyn said...

Ouch. Take it easy, Pat.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Hope you feel better Pat.

bill r. said...

What the hell's going on here? Marilyn changed her movie (after I'd added Guys and Dolls to the queue), Jonathan's decided to go and get all political on us, Arbo throws in a gratuitous slam at 30 Rock, there's no way I'm going to get a chance to finish watching The Cars that Ate Paris before my wife gets home, I bought too much stuff today, Marilyn discloses her hatred of the young, which I share, and nobody wished me a happy birthday yesterday even though I'm sure I sent you all a mass e-mail expressly demanding that you do so! This is the worst Christmas ever!

Lindsay Vivian said...

Here, here! And you're a jolly-good-fellow! Remember Jerry Maguire's memo? Or was it a mission statement? Anywho, well said! Write for yourself, the rest will fall into place. You're right, though, it's hard to really be honest at least in public, without ruffling about a million pounds of feathers. I say use your voice while were still Americans!
Also, I'm very excited for your upcoming montages, the horror theme really caught my interest. And finally, at the risk of sounding insensitive, I wish you a Merry Christmas!

Jonathan Lapper said...

Bill, you sound like those teenagers on my Invisible Edge post today.

And a Happy Belated Birthday my friend! Boy that must've sucked having a birthday so close to Christmas growing up. Even if you get more presents it doesn't feel like you have two separate times during the year where you celebrate because it's all crammed into three days.

So anyway, Happy Birthday again!

Jonathan Lapper said...

Lindsay, not insensitive at all since I celebrate Christmas anyway. It may be a secular celebration with me but I still celebrate it. As for my short movie, that one is a "Happy Holidays" message because I'm well aware that I have many readers who belong to other faiths and I don't want to leave them out. It's a wish for the New Year. I hope you enjoy it.

bill r. said...

Why thanks, Jonathan! How nice of you to remember and comment on my birthday!

Larry Aydlette said...

Oh J-dude: It's just not the holiday season until writers start second-guessing themselves and the meaning of existence.

Now, as Cher says: SNAP OUT OF IT!

Happy Holidays.

Jonathan Lapper said...

You're welcome Bill.

Larry, I'm out of it. Now be sure and check back Wednesday for my holiday video. It's classy. Yeah, real classy-like.

Adam Ross said...

I'm with you on being envious of other writers who can be blunt and concise with their opinions (positive or negative). I would toss Larry into the ones you mentioned who excel at that.

I think part of my problem is I'm too nice, but at least I have an excuse (surrounded by Mormons). Good luck in 2009!

Peter Nellhaus said...

Jonathan: I'm not certain about just having current movies in your Netflix queue, especially if they are current Hollywood films. There is so much interesting stuff out there that my queue is always full. I am taking advantage of the instant viewing which makes a little more room each time, and there are some films that can only be seen that way like Corman's Gunslinger, Daves' Badlanders and even a Fassbinder film, among many others.

As for resolutions, I will be blunt: Didn't watching Citizen Kane teach you anything about mission statements?

Good luck with the smoking, though.

Fox said...

Jonathan-

To be honest, I'm kinda surprised to hear you say you second guess yourself. In fact, the bloggers on here that expressed that same feeling surprise me as well.

I'm not saying I doubted you had humility, it's just you blog... and cut videos... and make banners... etc. with a lot of confidence. Same goes for everyone here in the comments. We've all read writers/bloggers that tiptoe around topics and it's painfully obvious how painful it is to them.

But I feel confident saying that everyone here goes for it on a daily basis. And that's awesome. Write, write, write, and don't look back. Sometimes you fall on your face, but that's ok, scars are cool.

I just kissed all y'alls asses. MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!

Jonathan Lapper said...

Adam, you are too nice. I want you to start yelling more and calling people names. Start with Bill. Go to his blog and just start ragging on him. He probably won't say anything back. He's pretty timid.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Peter, my Declaration of Principles will be adhered to. My theatre critic, Fox, has kept a copy to make sure I stick to it.

As for the queue, I'm just trying to catch up on 2008 releases, foreign or domestic. I'm not loading up the queue with crap but with the generally well received movies of the year. However, some of those well received movies I've seen so far have me scratching my head as to why they were well received. But I'll elaborate on that further when I do my year in review in January.

January 6th - smoke free. Promise.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Fox, the confusion lies with the fact that when I do write something I don't hold back. The holding back comes from what I decide to write. There are a few topics I would think about covering and then not because I didn't want to be bothered with the discussion or disagreements.

I think it's good once or twice a year to mention in a post your thought process behind blogging. Mainly it helps you understand your own goals better and you're more likely to achieve them. In my experience at least.

Peter Nellhaus said...

Jonathan: One of the problem with trying to stay current is that there is a lag time with many foreign films. For recent Thai films, you should have Syndromes and a Century, Citizen Dog and Sars War in your queue. For Filipino films, check with Noel Vera. For Korean films, hopefully you've at least kept up with Kim Ki-duk and Park Chan-wook for starts. I'm thinking of doing more Asian coverage with more DVDs that may only be available as imports.

Campaspe said...

I have found you to be on a roll of late, so I am sad that you felt any need to apologize for being really good in the first place. Thank you for the kind words about me. I must dissent from Peter, however, pace Citizen Kane. This sort of a post is a good thing. I did a similar one last year and since then I figure I can always provide a link if the urge to unburden hits again: Follow to prior apology here.

If I make a New Year's resolution it will have to do with Google Reader or some sort of RSS thingy so I can keep up with reading.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Peter, I've put those in my queue, thanks for the heads up.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Campaspe, I agree, what does Peter know? He's just a troublemaker, plain and simple. As for Google reader and RSS thingys they're a piece of cake. Readers give you an overview of however many blogs you choose to subscribe to so you can instantly see if they've updated or not. You can read the post directly in the reader but I always opt to go to the blog itself. I know from my own graphic design obsessions that people do put some work into their layout and banners and I like to see it when they update rather than just word-document like printout on the screen.

Peter Nellhaus said...

"Campaspe, I agree, what does Peter know?"

That's the last time I comment on anything in Cinema Styles.

Peter Nellhaus said...

D'oh!!!

Jonathan Lapper said...

I was talking about Peter Bogdanovich!

Peter Nellhaus? He's the man!!!

Peter Nellhaus said...

Why thank you.

My reference to Kane was tongue in cheek.

Jonathan Lapper said...

No explanation necessary. 90 percent of all comments here are tongue in cheek. So you fit right in.

Peter Nellhaus said...

I just checked Amazon to see what releases are scheduled for the near future. Sony has a Michael Powell double feature DVD of Stairway to Heaven and Age of Consent. The second film was Powell's final feature and has Helen Mirren when she was young, cute and undressed.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Stairway to Heaven is high on my list of DVDs to own. That's great news. And the Helen Mirren news ain't bad either.

Kimberly said...

Good luck with your writing, even though I don't think you need it. But as I've mentioned before, I get a lot of enjoyment from your posts on controversial films about nuclear warfare, etc.

I personally often back off on writing a lot of strong opinion pieces due to my fear of assholes. I have very liberal views but I also don't follow one party line so discussions can get complicated. I also tend to shy away from arguments online. If I don't agree with someone I often won't comment on their posts for example. I've gotten into some heated discussions with Arbo for example and I've backed out of a few conversations before it got too ugly. I'm not afraid of a good discussion, but I also know when I've hit a brick wall with someone.

I find that many bloggers just enjoy tossing off opinions without much thought to how it night effect readers or someone who disagrees with them. I don't personally enjoy flippant writing like that. I also don't like wide open assumptions or people who enjoy easy labels, etc. If someone makes a strong statement they better be able to back it up with facts or at least a reasoned explanation for why they feel that way instead of "just because."

Whatever you do, I'm sure it will be worth reading!

Fox said...

Sony has a Michael Powell double feature DVD of Stairway to Heaven and Age of Consent. The second film was Powell's final feature and has Helen Mirren when she was young, cute and undressed.

Peter just made me excited, then 2 seconds later... confused.

I've been waiting for a lush packaging of Stairway To Heaven for years... and know it's getting a double feature release!?!? Peter, is it one of those cheap 2-for-1 things, or is a double disc treatment?

Stairway To Heaven is my favorite movie of all time, and I would be bummed to see it finally arrive on DVD like Troll/Troll 2.

P.S. I'd like to see Age of Consent again, but I didn't like it when I saw it. Granted it was a shitty import bootleg VHS copy, so, you never know. But Peter's right about Helen Mirren being sultry. I think there is a butt shot.

Fox said...

There are a few topics I would think about covering and then not because I didn't want to be bothered with the discussion or disagreements.

I understand. I sometimes think I hold back in order to avoid too much disagreement or arguing. Sometimes I need it in order to flesh out my own thoughts, and sometimes I don't even see it coming.

But as you mentioned in your post, doing topics like racist portrayals in film is an interesting topic. I mean, yeah, that's gonna start some passionate back-and-forth, but I think it can be done without ugliness.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Kimberly, I know what you mean about people attaching labels. If you support one view on one thing then surely you fall in line with everything else that view is connected with. I hate that way of thinking and it's hard to debate something intelligently when right out of the starting gate people start making assumptions. I admit I've been guilty of it myself. But I look forward to starting the New Year fresh and excited about my writing. Sometimes taking a week off is the best thing you can do for yourself.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Fox, I hope it's a great transfer too. I love Powell's films so much and would love to own each one on its own stand alone special edition disc.

I sometimes think I hold back in order to avoid too much disagreement or arguing.

You? Fox, I have never gotten the feeling that you hold back, ever. And the thing with my posts on race in Hollywood and nuclear proliferation is that they didn't get any discussion really. They bored people mainly I think but I'll keep doing them anyway. I'm not kidding when I say that Kimberly was pretty much the lone commenter on almost all of them, which reminds me, I have to update the archived comments on those posts.

Anyway, I just watched a "favorite" doc again on the subject (nuclear testing) and plan to review it in January. The "favorite" is in quotes because it's pretty brutal in its portrayel of the casualties of testing so it's not a movie you "enjoy" so much, as appreciate and admire.

Arbogast said...

I'd like to start "a passionate back-and-forth" ... with Joan Collins!

Circa 1972, of course. Not so much now.

Arbogast said...

I find that many bloggers just enjoy tossing off...

Hey, I'm just answering a natural human need!

...opinions without much thought to how it might effect readers or someone who disagrees with them.

Oh. I get it. I shouldn't have interrupted. Never mind what I wrote before. Can you edit comments?

Campaspe said...

Peter, you know very well I worship you. And your blog. And your coffee pictures. And Citizen Kane.

There, that's enough worship, even for Christmas.

Jonathan Lapper said...

Thank you Campaspe. God bless us, everyone (even Peter and Arbogast).